Experience True Nature Alaska Wilderness Adventure Tours beyond Imagination



 

AK#02 Discover Alaska Self Drive Tour | Pre-Post Cruise Land Tour

A simply perfect pre/post self drive tour for cruise passengers from Seattle and Vancouver disembarking in Whittier. Pick up your rental car in Whittier and explore the spectacular state of Alaska. Visit the town of Seward and join the spectacular narrated wildlife and glacier cruise within renowned Kenai Fjords National Park. Drive north to Talkeetna where you have the chance to take a flightseeing tour to Mt. Denali (formerly Mt. McKinley). Discover famous Denali National Park - one of Alaska’s most popular attraction. Denali National Park is the natural habitat for more than 380 Grizzly Bears, Moose, Wolf, Fox, Lynx, Dall Sheep and Caribou. It is most likely you will spot some of them while taking our full day shuttle bus or Tundra wilderness tour. You may also enjoy other Denali activities: short guided hikes, Nenana rafting or float trip, backcountry jeep adventure, guided helicopter hiking trips or a sled dog demonstration. Please Note: The self drive tour is also available in reverse. Tour extension & alterations on request.

  • Tour Itinerary

  • Dates | Rates

  • Options | Extensions

  • Self Drive FAQ

  • Destination Info


Day
01

Whittier (or Anchorage) - Seward

Pick up your rental car in Whittier (or Anchorage) and drive to Portage. After a stop at the visitor center continue to Seward, a small fishing community at the gateway to Kenai Fjords National Park. This afternoon you have time to visit Exit Glacier. Short trails lead to the Toe of the Glacier where you can climb on the surface of the glacier itself. You may spend some time at the Alaska SeaLife Center – the world’s first cold water marine search institute with wildlife rehabilitation and public education facilities, try your luck halibut or salmon fishing or attend a kayaking tour from Lowell Point - the choice is yours. Distance: 120 Miles | Overnight: Seward


Day
02

Seward | Kenai Fjords National Park
 

In the morning joing the Kenai Fjords catamaran cruise for an exciting glacier and wildlife cruise into magnificent Aialik Bay with its calving glaciers and stunning scenery. Covering 110-miles, the trip is narrated by a National Park Ranger, who is highly adept at spotting wildlife and pointing out the many spectacular sights. Wildlife is abundant throughout Kenai Fjords National Park, and the tidewater glaciers are massive. You'll visit the mighty Aialik Glacier where guests witness calving - a process by which glaciers shed giant blocks and slabs of ancient ice. The cruise also offers the good chance to spot whales in Alaska. Overnight: Seward


Day
03

Seward - Talkeetna
 

On your drive north to Anchorage stopover at Alyeska. Tucked in a glacier valley between the mountains and the sea, the community is a popular year-round destination. Take the Alyeska Tramway to get a bird's eye view of the surrounding glaciers and the Turnagain Arm. Enjoy sweeping views of snowcapped mountain peaks while traveling from Anchorage on the George Parks Highway via Wasilla (Iditarod Museum) to Talkeetna. The community was established as a mining town and trading post before either Wasilla or Anchorage existed. Several of its old log buildings are today historical landmarks. The town is internationally recognized as the base for many of the climbing expeditions that challenge Mt. McKinley, Mt. Hunter and Mt. Foraker during the summertime. Distance: 240 Miles | Overnight: Talkeetna


Day
04

Talkeetna - Denali National Park
 

This morning you have time to join a flightseeing trip within 6-Miles of Mt. Denali's 20.320 ft summit and get a picture perfect view of the Kahiltna and Ruth Glacier with its Great Gorge - over 9.000 ft deep - as well as onto magnificent ice-falls. You'll also see the Sheldon Amphitheatre - the largest of its kind in the world. During the tour you may catch also sights of mountain climbers. Highlight will be an adventurous glacier landing. Continue your journey along the Alaska Range through Denali State Park with countless wildlife viewing opportunities. Stopover at Byers Lake and rent a canoe or kayak. Arrive at Denali Village. The Denali parks office provides many informative ranger-naturalist programs, slide shows and sled dog demonstrations. Distance: 110 Miles | Overnight: Denali National Park.


Day
05

Denali National Park | Shuttle Bus Wildlife Tour
 

Denali National Park offers excellent wildlife viewing opportunities and spectacular sceneries. Pick up your pre-reserved tickets and explore the WAC center if time allows. Board the bus, sit back and watch out for grizzly bears, moose, caribou, wolf and fox moving along the ridges and river beds or observe one of the 150 different bird species which inherit the park area. Your driver informs you about the history of Denali National Park, its diverse wildlife and flora. Once a bear, caribou or another animal has been spotted the bus will stop that everyone can watch and take pictures. Your tour turns around at Eielson Visitor Center - a four hour drive. We can extend the bus tour to Wonder Lake or Kantishna Roadhouse. You can get off the bus anytime you wish and take a stroll, go hiking and enjoy the landscape. Return to the Denali Park entrance anytime during the day. Overnight: Denali National Park


Day
06

Denali National Park - Anchorage
 

Spend the morning at Denali National Park and watch a sled dog demonstration presented by the park ranger. Join a exhilarating rafting or float trip on the Nenana River or join a backcountry ATV tour. Return to Anchorage during the day. Alternative Routing: From the Parks Highway drive via Hatcher Pass Road to the Independence Mine Historical Park - operated from 1938 - 1941 by one of the largest gold producers in the Willow Creek Mining District, - the Alaska Pacific Consolidated Mine Co. Continue via Palmer - located in the heart of the Matanuska Valley to Anchorage. Distance: 230 Miles | Overnight Anchorage


Day
07

Anchorage
 

Remaining day in Anchorage on your own. Explore Alaska's largest city by yourself and visit the many points of interests. Take a walk on the Coastal Trail along Cook Inlet to Earthquake Park with a magnificent view of the Alaska Mountain Range in the distance. Don't miss a delicious lunch at one of Anchorage's top seafood restaurants. Return the rental car at the airport. Individual tour extensions or sightseeing tours are available.

 



AK#02 Discover Alaska Self Drive Tour | Superior Hotels
Rates in US $ / per Person Single      Double      Triple      Quad      Child     
May 10 - May 31 $ 2070.00 $ 1165.00 $ 890.00 $ 760.00 $ 170.00

June 01 - August 31 $ 2650.00 $ 1430.00 $ 1070.00 $ 895.00 $ 170.00

September 01 - September 15 $ 2070.00 $ 1165.00 $ 890.00 $ 760.00 $ 170.00

 

AK#02 Discover Alaska Self Drive Tour | First Class Hotels
Rates in US $ / per Person Single      Double      Triple      Quad      Child     
May 10 - May 31 $ 2310.00 $ 1265.00 $ 960.00 $ 820.00 $ 170.00

June 01 - August 31 $ 3030.00 $ 1630.00 $ 1210.00 $ 990.00 $ 170.00

September 01 - September 15 $ 2310.00 $ 1265.00 $ 960.00 $ 820.00 $ 170.00

 

Departure Days
Daily Departures from May 10 - September 15

 

Services included
  • 6 Nights Superior or First Class Hotel Accommodation
  • Hotel & State Tax
  • 7 Day Rental Car (Compact) - Upgrades available
  • Unlimited Free Mileage
  • Rental Car Licensing Fee
  • MOA / State Vehicle Tax
  • Rental Car One Way Fee
  • Full Day Kenai Fjords Glacier Cruise from Seward
  • Seward Harbor Tax, Kenai Fjords Park Fee
  • Denali Shuttle Bus Ticket to Eielson Visitor Center
  • Denali National Park Fee
  • Alaska Travel Book & Sightseeing Information
  • Tour Documentation



Flexible Tour Options - Upgrades & Sightseeing
Rates in US $ | per Person Adult
Denali: Extend your Shuttle Bus Tour to Wonder Lake $ 12.00

Exchange Shuttle Bus to Escorted 12-Hour Kantishna Wilderness Lodge Tour with Lunch,
Interpretive Program, Gold Panning, En-route Refreshments
Departure: 6:00 am / Return 6:00 pm
$ 125.00

Denali: ATV Wilderness Adventure (2 1/2 hrs) $ 95.00

Talkeetna: Mt. Denali Flightseeing Tour + $85 Optional Glacier Landing
(includes 4 % Transportation Fee)
$ 205.00

 

Rental Car - Upgrade
Rental Car Category Rental Car Type      Car Upgrade      Additional Day     
Compact Car Chevrolet Aveo or similar Included $ 115.00
Mid Size Car Toyota Corolla or similar $ 50.00 $ 120.00
Full Size Car Chevrolet Malibu or similar $ 90.00 $ 125.00
Standard SUV Toyota Highlander or similar $ 450.00 $ 187.00
Premium SUV Chevrolet Suburban or similar $ 720.00 $ 250.00
Mini Van Dodge Grand Caravan or similar $ 450.00 $ 187.00

Rates include Taxes, Unlimited Free Mileage

 

Additional Nights - Anchorage
Rates in US $ | per Person Hotel Category      Single      Double      Triple      Quad      Child     
May 15 - May 31 Superior Hotel $135.00 $68.00 $49.00 $40.00 $10.00
June 01 - August 31 Superior Hotel $160.00 $80.00 $55.00 $45.00 $10.00
September 01 - September 15 Superior Hotel $135.00 $68.00 $49.00 $40.00 $10.00

May 15 - May 31 First Class Hotel $170.00 $85.00 $65.00 $55.00 $10.00
June 01 - August 31 First Class Hotel $250.00 $135.00 $90.00 $75.00 $10.00
September 01 - September 15 First Class Hotel $170.00 $85.00 $65.00 $55.00 $10.00

 

Alaska Sightseeing Destinations

Anchorage

Fairbanks

Juneau

McCarthy

Homer

Seward

Cooper Landing

Talkeetna



 
Self Drive Tours Information - FAQ


  Q:
A:
I like to spend more time in a certain destination. Can I change the routing?
All of our tours are ”Flex Drives” and we can add, modify or exchange nights in destinations to suit your timetable and preferred routing. Thus, sometimes it will be necessary to observe ferry schedules, national park opening/closing dates etc to match certain dates and/or departures. Please check also each itinerary online.

  Q:
A:
What is the difference between single, double, triple and quad room?
Single: A room assigned to one person. May have one or more beds.
Double: A room assigned to two people. May have one or more beds.
Triple: A room assigned to three people. May have two or more beds.
Quad: A room assigned to four people. May have two or more beds.
The maximum occupancy per room is four.
We can arrange our self drive tours including 2 rooms and 1 rental car if your group is larger than 4.

  Q:
A:
I cannot find the list of hotels included?
Each tour includes a choice of pre-reserved superior hotels (*** category) or first class hotels (**** category). If you have any special requirements we can certainly customize any of the advertised tours. Please contact us for advice and applicable rates. Hotel accommodation does not include breakfast or other meals. Please Note: A large number clients and travel agencies are using our pages and travel ideas to plan their “own” customized tours. This is the reason why we do not publish the hotel names for each trip on top of all travel planning information already included on our pages. If you have any particular question about accommodation, please contact us.

  Q:
A:
Do you offer bed and breakfast accommodation
Yes, we can substitute our advertised hotel category with bed and breakfasts (B&B) accommodation (breakfast included) for any of the advertised itineraries. Please contact us for availability.

  Q:
A:
Do you have one-way rental cars or tours between Alaska and the Yukon/Canada?
No - we do not provide any one way rentals between Alaska (USA) and the Yukon Territory (Canada) Certain government and insurance regulations do not permit such rentals. We offer one way rentals to Skagway, Haines & Juneau.

  Q:
A:
Are Car Rental Charges Included?
Yes, the rental of a compact car (automatic) is always included in our flex drive tour packages. Additional rental days or upgrade details and rates for mid and full size car, passenger vans or a sport utility vehicle (4x4) are available on each self-drive page. All upgrade rates are per car and not per person. Our advertised rates include also local taxes, unlimited free mileage, airport concessionaire fees, licensing fees. Rental car insurance is optional. Many Americans have their own car insurance that also covers them with the rental cars. Please contact us if you require rental car insurance. We provide a complimentary transfer from your downtown hotel to the rental station.
A valid driver license and a valid major credit card are mandatory for all individual vehicle rentals and/or tour packages including vehicle rentals. Driving on gravel roads/highways is at own risk. The rental car insurance is void on the following highways Denali Highway, Dalton Highway, Top of the World Highway, Taylor Highway, McCarthy Road, Dempster Highway and all other gravel roads. You will be responsible for any damages. Drivers have to be more than 25 years of age and the drivers license has to be valid for more than 1 year. Contact us if you are below 25 years of age.

  Q:
A:
What if something unexpected goes wrong during the Tour?
We do not anticipate anything but you can contact us, the rental car company or any of the pre-reserved hotels for assistance. We have a 24 hr emergency help line available for our guests.

  Q:
A:
What type of Identification do I need to enter Canada and Alaska/USA
The Visa/entry requirements do change frequently. Please check requirements on the appropriate government pages. We are unable to take any responsibility for such information however you will definitely need your passport. Please ask us if your self drive tour enters Canada.

  Q:
A:
Which services are included in your Self Drive Tours
Please refer to the appropriate tour page for a listing of included services. Our service generally includes the rental car, accommodation, applicable local taxes, ferry trips as scheduled, sightseeing as per itinerary, a detailed tour description, highway or road logs. Not included are: Meals, highway tolls, gasoline, entrance fees, additional sightseeing tours.

  Q:
A:
What is the advantage of Self-Drive Tour -VS- Escorted Tour
This depends on your personal preference. Alaska and the Yukon are providing some good and scenic highway connections and driving is very easy. A rental car with individual pre-reserved hotels are an independent way to discover the beauty of the northern wilderness areas and national parks: You can stop were you want, you have plenty of time for sightseeing off the beaten path and you are very flexible. Escorted tours are usually limited in flexibility because you are traveling with a group and fixed departures and routings.

  Q:
A:
When should I book a tour
If you travel during the high season from the middle/end of June until the end of August we recommend to make a  reservation as early as possible to avoid disappointments with sold out situations in highly frequented national parks and destinations - because the northern tour season is very short. The same applies in/around national holidays. Any hotel accommodation, rentals cars and ferry space must be definitely booked well in advance. Thus, tour operator such as our company may still have space on a short notice. Accordingly it is well worth to contact us.

  Q:
A:
When should I Travel
May, June and September are perfect months for a vacation in the Land of the Midnight Sun. The weather is usually stable and sunny with almost 24 hours of daylight. July and August are prime travel months and are obviously very busy.

  Q:
A:
When is the best time so see the Northern Lights
Due to the long daylight hours (up to 24-hours) during the summertime, it is impossible to see the Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis) from approximately mid May until the middle of August. Northern Lights are occuring mainly during the fall/winter months from end of August until the beginning of April. For further information please refer to our winter tour program.

  Q:
A:
What’s about sightseeing options during cruises and self-drives
We provide a choice of optional sightseeing adventures and activities such as wildlife viewing, rafting, self drive tours, flightseeing, hiking, rafting and day cruises. If you book these tours with us in advance - instead of onboard the cruise ships or locally - you will save a significant amount of money.

  Q:
A:
Should I compare rates & services on the Internet
Yes definitely. You notice sooner or later who actually provides the best services, rates and most affordable or specialized tour program because at these days almost everyone within the industry provides similar statements. Thus, you may also notice that some of the competitors web sites are completely outdated, terms & conditions are not published and that some of these people don’t even know the State – actually they are not even located within the USA or Canada. When you compare rates and services look for hidden charges such as reservation fees or ticketing fees, inclusion of taxes (up to 11 %), the exact service description, hotel categories, rental car standards etc and than make your decision.

  Q:
A:
Could I organize the same tour package by myself for less money
Probably not - because tour operator and corporate identities with a high volume of clients and revenue receive much lower rates than an individual person or a travel agent with a few reservations per year. In addition be prepared for: (1) a significant amount of time to find and identify the right products and destinations (2) to contact the different suppliers may be multiple times and wait for their response (3) exchanging continuously sensitive personal Information over the phone/internet (4) getting professional assistance and advise for the entire tour package - which usually includes a variety of tour components. Virtually impossible ! You can certainly book your hotels through Travelocity, Expedia or other global players – but this does not guarantee any savings either or the success of your vacation. PS: we do not even markup reservations for sightseeing tours. So you'll get always the current original rate when booking with us.

  Q:
A:
How can I get to Alaska or the Yukon Territory
Seattle is a major Alaska Airlines hub with multiple daily flight connections between the lower 48's and Alaska. In addition Chicago, Minneapolis, Los Angeles and San Francisco are alternative gateways with non-stop flights on Alaska Airlines, United, American Airlines and Delta to/from Anchorage and other destinations within Alaska. Clients from Europe may check Condor Airlines with it's non-stop flights between Frankfurt and Whitehorse, Fairbanks or Anchorage. You can fly to the Yukon Territory (Whitehorse) from Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton with Air Canada.

  Q:
A:
Do you offer railroad tours between Canada and Alaska
No, because there is no railroad access or any connection between Canada and Alaska.

  Q:
A:
How about traveling by ferry
Bellingham (USA) and Prince Rupert (Canada) are the main gateways for Alaska Marine Highway Ferry trips throughout the extremely scenic Inside Passage in southeast Alaska. Port of calls are: Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau, Sidka, the Glacier Bay, Skagway and Haines. If you plan to travel to Alaska by ferry please check our website for departures, fares, rates and reservations.

  Q:
A:
Should I purchase travel insurance ?
We strongly encourage you to purchase travel insurance to cover: cancellation fees associated with an outing as well as airfare or other nonrefundable expense in the event you need to cancel a trip; medical expenses incurred on a trip; and the cost of a possible medical evacuation from a trip. We have made arrangements with Allianz Travel Insurance Services for you to purchase a comprehensive travel insurance plan. Feel free to contact Allianz if you have questions on this policy or its coverage as we are not equipped to provide specific answers to questions on the insurance program.



Staff Travel Picks and Destination Roundup

Anchorage

Anchorage: Is by far Alaska's largest and most sophisticated city, Anchorage is situated in a truly spectacular location. The permanently snow-covered peaks and volcanoes of the Alaska Range lie to the west of the city, part of the craggy Chugach Range is actually within the eastern edge of the municipality, and the Talkeetna and Kenai ranges are visible to the north and south. On clear days Mt. McKinley looms on the northern horizon, and two arms of Cook Inlet embrace the town's western and southern borders. The Native Heritage Center: There are more than 200 Native tribal entities in Alaska. At the Heritage Center, experience the lifestyles and traditions of these Native cultures through art and artifact displays and activities like blanket tossing, parka sewing, and drumming. Portage Glacier: This glacier has been receding rapidly, but you can ride the tour boat Ptarmigan across the lake to view its face. Keep an eye out for office building-size chunks of ice falling into the water. Flattop Mountain: Drive to the Glen Alps parking lot in Chugach State Park and take the short walk west to a scenic overlook on a clear day the view sweeps from Denali south along the Alaska Range past several active volcanoes on the other side of Cook Inlet. Or follow the hikers to the top of the mountain for even more stunning scenery. Native Crafts: Alaska's rich Native culture is reflected in its abundance of craft traditions, from totem poles to intricate baskets and detailed carvings. Many of the native crafts you'll see across the state are results of generations of traditions passed down among tribes; the craft process is usually labor-intensive, using local resources such as rye grasses or fragrant cedar trees. Each of Alaska's native groups is noted for particular skills. Inuit art includes ivory carvings, spirit masks, dance fans, baleen baskets, and jewelry. Also be on the lookout for mukluks (seal- or reindeer-skin boots). The Tlingit peoples of Southeast Alaska are known for their totem poles, as well as for baskets and hats woven from spruce root and cedar bark. Tsimshian Indians also work with spruce root and cedar bark, and Haida Indians are noted basket makers and carvers. Athabascans specialize in birch-bark creations, decorated fur garments, and beadwork. The Aleut, a maritime people dwelling in the southwest reaches of the state, make grass basketry that is considered among the best in the world.


Talkeetna | Denali National Park

Denali National Park: is one of the most popular and most visited destinations for a reason: the most accessible of Alaska's national parks and one of only three connected to the state of Alaska highway system. This is a spectacular and scenic 6-million-acre wilderness region offering views of mountains so big they seem like a wall on the horizon, endless wildlife from cinnamon-colored Toklat grizzlies to herds of caribou, to moose with antlers the size of coffee tables and glaciers with forests growing on them. All can be experienced by saddle safari, bus trip, or flightseeing tour. Hike, bike, stroll, or raft through it. Camp out, or bundle up in a cabin. The first 15 mi of the park road are paved, but after that there's just gravel. Visitors must ride on a bus or get off and see Denali on foot. No matter how you get there or which adventure you choose, Denali is truly a wonderful experience. When planning your trip consider whether you want to strike out on your own as a backcountry traveler, or to stay at a lodge nearby and enjoy Denali on day hikes and by shuttle bus. Either option requires some individual advance planning or simply contact us and book one of our package tours with hotel or backcountry lodge overnights, railroad transportation from Anchorage and sightseeing tours.
 

Talkeetna: For the ultimate mountain sightseeing adventure, take a flight from Talkeetna and land on a glacier—if you're early enough in the summer, you can fly onto the Kahiltna Glacier, where teams attempting to summit the mountain gather. Mount McKinley: There are a dozen places between Anchorage and Fairbanks that boast the best viewing of Mt. McKinley. At 20,320 feet, McKinley is the highest peak in North America, and just about any place within 100 mi can be deemed a good viewing area. The crown jewel of Alaska is often shrouded in clouds, but even a glimpse will reveal the sheer size of the snow-covered giantess.


The Inside Passage | Juneau | Glacier Bay National Park

If you don't arrive in Alaska by cruise ship, make a point of taking a ferry trip along the longest, deepest fjord in North America. Depending on which ferry you take, the trip from Juneau to Skagway can be two or six hours long. We recommend taking your time. In the summer the tall peaks surrounding the boats release hundreds of waterfalls from snow and glacial melt. If you're lucky, you'll see pods of orcas, humpbacks, and dolphins. Mt. Roberts, Juneau: The tram takes you up the mountain and, if the weather cooperates, offers great views of the area. It's another cruise-ship favorite, but at least you can have a quick beer as you soak in the scenery. Mendenhall Glacier, Juneau: This drive-up glacier comes complete with visitor center, educational exhibits, nature trails, and, when the cruise ships are in town, lots of bused-in tourists. Don't let the crush of visitors dissuade you from stopping by, though—it's a great resource for learning about glacier dynamics and the natural forces that have shaped Alaska. Glacier Bay National Park | Gustavus: Whether you view this natural wonder by air, boat, or on foot, Glacier Bay is well worth the effort and expense it takes to get there. Gustavus is the gateway to Glacier Bay, the place that the father of the national parks system, John Muir, called "unspeakably pure and sublime" in 1879. It is considered by many to be 70 mi of the finest sea kayaking in the world. The first 24 square mi comprise the Beardslee Islands, a complex system for kayakers who glide atop flat water between tides, enveloped in silence except for the sound of water slapping paddles, the soft spray from a nearby porpoise, and the howl of a wolf in the distance. And you'll likely be enjoying these sights with no other travelers nearby. Still, kayaking in this region presents challenges. There is a lively population of moose and bears on the islands, so it is imperative to choose wisely when setting up camp. Most visitors kayak only to the top of the Beardslees, which can take three to five days round-trip. Alaska Marine Highway System: The ferry provides access twice a week to Gustavus.


The Kenai Peninsula - Alaska‘s Playground

Kenai Fjords National Park: Photogenic Seward is the gateway to the 670,000-acre Kenai Fjords National Park. This is spectacular coastal parkland incised with sheer, dark, slate cliffs rising from the sea, ribboned with white waterfalls, and tufted with deep-green spruce. Kenai Fjords presents a rare opportunity for an up-close view of blue tidewater glaciers as well as some remarkable ocean wildlife. Seward, Exit Glacier: You can take a short, easy walk to view this glacier, or if you're in the mood for a challenge, hike the steep trail onto the enormous Harding Icefield. Scan the nearby cliffs for mountain goats and watch for bears. Seward Sea-Life Center: Spend an afternoon at the Alaska SeaLife Center, with massive cold-water tanks and outdoor viewing decks as well as interactive displays of cold-water fish, seabirds, and marine mammals, including harbor seals and a 2,000-pound sea lion. A research center as well as visitor center, it also rehabilitates injured marine wildlife and provides educational experiences for the general public. Appropriately, the center was partially funded with reparations money from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Films, hands-on activities, a gift shop, and behind-the-scenes tours ($12 and up) complete the offerings. Homer: at the southern end of the Sterling Highway lies the city of Homer, at the base of a narrow spit that juts 4 mi into beautiful Kachemak Bay. Glaciers and snowcapped mountains form a dramatic backdrop across the water. Protruding into Kachemak Bay, Homer Spit provides a sandy focal point for visitors and locals. A paved path stretches most of the 4 mi and is great for biking or walking. A commercial-fishing-boat harbor at the end of the path has restaurants, hotels, charter-fishing businesses, sea-kayaking outfitters, art galleries, and on-the-beach camping spots. Fly a kite, walk the beaches, drop a line in the Fishing Hole, or just wander through the shops looking for something interesting; this is one of Alaska's favorite summertime destinations.Kachemak Bay: abounds with wildlife, including a large population of puffins and eagles. Tour operators take you past bird rookeries or across the bay to gravel beaches for clam digging. Most fishing charters include an opportunity to view whales, seals, porpoises, and birds close up. At the end of the day, walk along the docks on Homer Spit and watch commercial fishing boats and charter boats unload their catch. Halibut Cove: Directly across from the end of Homer Spit is Halibut Cove, a small artists' community. Spend a relaxing afternoon or evening meandering along the boardwalk and visiting galleries. The cove is lovely, especially during salmon runs, when fish leap and splash in the clear water. Several lodges are on this side of the bay, on pristine coves away from summer crowds. The Danny J ferries people across from Homer Spit, with a stop at the rookery at Gull Island and two or three hours to walk around Halibut Cove. The ferry makes two trips daily: the first leaves Homer at 12:00 pm and returns at 5:00 pm, and the second leaves at 5:00 pm and returns at 10:00 pm.


Sea Kayaking is big among Alaskans. It was the Aleuts who invented the kayak (or bidarka) for fishing and hunting marine mammals. When early explorers encountered the Aleuts, they compared them to sea creatures, so at home did they appear on their small ocean craft. Kayaks have the great advantage of portability. More stable than canoes, they also give you a feel for the water and a view from water level. Oceangoing kayakers will find plenty of offshore Alaska adventures, especially in the protected waters of the Southeast, Prince William Sound, and Kenai Fjords National Park. The variety of Alaska marine life that you can view from a sea kayak is astonishing. It's possible to see whales, seals, sea lions, and sea otters, as well as bird species too numerous to list. Although caution is required when dealing with large stretches of open water, the truly Alaskan experience of self-propelled boating in a pristine ocean environment can be a life-changing thrill.

The Fishing: In summer salmon fill the rivers, which you can fish with a guide, from your own boat, or from the bank. Fishing for halibut and rockfish is also possible from charter boats out of Homer or Seward.


The Winter Wonderland | Aurora Viewing | Skiing | Dog Mushing

The most popular attraction in the wintertime doesn't charge admission or have set viewing times. The Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis) seem to appear without rhyme or reason. There is a science to it, but explanations are still hotly debated by meteorologists, astronomers, and pretty-color enthusiasts. Seeing the northern lights requires that there be no nearby city light, very little moonlight, the cold fall and winter months, and a lot of luck. Hot springs outside Fairbanks keep the hopeful warm while they watch the skies. There is something about the incongruous number of hours of sunlight and darkness Alaska gets that makes Alaskans yearn to break the rules of time. When you arrive in Alaska you may feel inclined to do the same. In many parts of the state bars still stay open all night long, fishermen can be sitting on the ice all hours of the night, and some people ski best when the witching hour strikes. At Alyeska Ski Resort in Girdwood, skiers can take the lift and bite the powder under the stars. On weekends this popular ski resort offers night skiing, and afterwards, in the bar, rewards its visitors with live, high-energy, danceable music. This provides a good look at local Alaskan culture, as it caters to tourists and residents alike.


Alaska's Top Bear Viewing Destinations

Katmai National Park | Brooks River: When people come to Alaska they want to see bears. Yet most visitors never get a glimpse, because bears prefer their privacy. But at Katmai National Park, which boasts the largest brown bear population in the world, you're almost guaranteed a photograph of bears doing bear things. Remember, although they look cute, their teeth and claws are still mighty sharp.
 

Kodiak Island: The 1.9-million-acre Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge lies mostly on Kodiak Island and neighboring Afognak and Uganik islands, in the Gulf of Alaska. All are part of the Kodiak Archipelago, separated from Alaska's mainland by the stormy Shelikof Strait. Within the refuge are rugged mountains, tundra meadows and lowlands, thickly forested hills that are enough different shades of green to make a leprechaun cry, plus lakes, marshes, and hundreds of miles of pristine coastland. No place in the refuge is more than 15 mi from the ocean. The weather here is generally wet and cool, and storms born in the North Pacific often bring heavy rains. Dozens of species of birds flock to the refuge each spring and summer, including Aleutian terns, horned puffins, black oystercatchers, ravens, ptarmigan, and chickadees. At least 600 pairs of bald eagles live on the islands, building the world's largest bird nests on shoreline cliffs and in tall trees. Seeing the Kodiak brown bears alone is worth the trip to this rugged country. When they emerge from their dens in spring, the bears chow down on some skunk cabbage to wake their stomachs up, have a few extra salads of sedges and grasses, and then feast on the endless supply of fish when salmon return. About the time they start thinking about hibernating again the berries are ripe (they may eat 2,000 or more berries a day). Kodiak brown bears, the biggest brown bears anywhere, sometimes topping out at more than 1,500 pounds, share the refuge with only a few other land mammals: red foxes, river otters, short-tailed weasels, and tundra voles. Six species of Pacific salmon - chums, kings, pinks, silvers, sockeyes, and steelhead—return to Kodiak's waters from May to October. Other resident species include rainbow trout, Dolly Varden (an anadromous trout waiting for promotion to salmon), and arctic char. The abundance of fish and bears makes the refuge popular with anglers, hunters, and wildlife-watchers.
 

Lake Clark National Park | Redoubt Bay When the weather is good, an idyllic choice beyond the Mat-Su Valley is the 3.4-million-acre Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, on the Alaska Peninsula and a short flight from Anchorage or Kenai and Soldotna. The parklands stretch from the coast to the heights of two grand volcanoes: Mt. Iliamna and Mt. Redoubt (which made headlines in 2009 when it erupted, sending ash floating over the region), both topping out above 10,000 feet. The country in between holds glaciers, waterfalls, and turquoise-tinted lakes. The 50-mi-long Lake Clark, filled by runoff waters from the mountains that surround it, is an important spawning ground for thousands of red (sockeye) salmon. The river-running is superb in this park. You can make your way through dark forests of spruce and balsam poplars or hike over the high, easy-to-travel tundra. The animal life is profuse: look for bears, moose, Dall sheep, wolves, wolverines, foxes, beavers, and mink on land; seals, sea otters, and white (or beluga) whales offshore. Wildflowers embroider the meadows and tundra in spring, and wild roses bloom in the shadows of the forests. Plan your trip to Lake Clark for the end of June or early July, when the insects may be less plentiful. Or consider late August or early September, when the tundra glows with fall colors.


Wrangell St. Elias National Park

In a land of many grand and spectacularly beautiful mountains, those in the 9.2-million-acre Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve are possibly the finest of them all. This extraordinarily compact cluster of immense peaks belongs to four different mountain ranges. Rising through many ecozones, the Wrangell-St. Elias Park and Preserve is largely undeveloped wilderness parkland on a grand scale. The area is perfect mountain-biking and primitive-hiking terrain, and the rivers invite rafting for those with expedition experience. The mountains attract climbers from around the world; most of them fly in from Glennallen or Yakutat. The nearby abandoned Kennicott Mine is one of the park's main visitor attractions. The open pit mine is reminiscent of ancient Greek amphitheatres, and the abandoned structures are as impressive as the mountains they stand against.


Prince William Sound

Tucked into the east side of the Kenai Peninsula, the sound is a peaceful escape from the throngs of people congesting the towns and highways. Enhanced with steep fjords, green enshrouded waterfalls, and calving tidewater glaciers, Prince William Sound is a stunning arena. It has a convoluted coastline, in that it is riddled with islands, which makes it hard to discern just how vast the area is. The sound covers almost 15,000 square mi—more than 12 times the size of Rhode Island—and is home to more than 150 glaciers. The sound is vibrantly alive with all manner of marine life, including salmon, halibut, humpback and orca whales, sea otters, sea lions, and porpoises. Bald eagles are easily seen soaring above, and often brown and black bears, Sitka black-tailed deer, and gray wolves can be spotted on the shore.

Unfortunately, the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989 heavily damaged parts of the sound, and oil still washes up on shore after high tides and storms. The original spill had a devastating effect on both animal and human lives. What lasting effect this lurking oil will have on the area is still being studied and remains a topic of much debate. Bring your rain gear, Prince William Sound receives more than 150 inches of rain per year. The sound is best explored by charter boat or guided excursion out of Whittier, Cordova, or Valdez. Even though the waters are mostly protected, open stretches are common, and the fickle Alaska weather can fool even experienced boaters. From the road system, Whittier and Valdez are your best bets for finding charter outfits.


A visit to Columbia Glacier, which flows from the surrounding Chugach Mountains, should certainly be on your Valdez agenda. Its deep aquamarine face is 5 mi across, and it calves icebergs with resounding cannonades. This glacier is one of the largest and most readily accessible of Alaska's coastal glaciers. The state ferry travels past the face of the glacier, and scheduled tours of the glaciers and the rest of the sound are available by boat and aircraft from Valdez, Cordova, and Whittier.



 

Go Alaska Tours | Secured Reservation Request Form

image

A secure transmission of your personal information is very important for the Alaska Travel Network Group LLC at these days and that's why we have taken steps to ensure that we have the most secure method of transmission on the Internet available. All online reservation request and contact forms are providing a SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) technology with a 128-bit encryption for transmission of data between your web browser and our web server which provides the highest level of protection from tampering and eavesdropping. 128-bit encryption is considered so secure that cryptographers consider it impossible to crack. There is no safer way for your personal information to be transmitted. In fact, both the Canadian and US Governments use 128-bit encryption for transmission of their sensitive data. The Go Alaska Tours Website (www.goalaskatours.com) uses GeoTrust for its SSL and 128-bit encryption.

Quick Navigation

Screen Resolution

For the best website content viewing the recommended screen resolution is 1920x1200 on Chrome, Safari 6 + IE Explorer and Firefox 24+ Browser